7 Ways to Prepare Your Home in Advance of Foot Surgery

7 Ways to Prepare Your Home in Advance of Foot Surgery

Are you scheduled for foot or ankle surgery? The thought of undergoing surgery can be scary, but sometimes, it’s the best option to treat painful foot concerns from Achilles tendon injuries to bunions.

While surgery eventually helps you get back to your favorite activities with less pain, recovery from foot and ankle surgery takes time, and your mobility will be limited.

Sean Rosenblum, DPM, and our team at Foot and Ankle Care of Passaic specialize in foot surgery and we’re here to answer all of your questions about recovery. When you’re scheduled for surgery, we give you specific instructions for healing based on the type of foot surgery you need, but there are some things we recommend to everyone.

Preparing in advance can make your recuperation easier, and here are seven ways to get yourself and your home ready.

1. Set up a bed on the ground floor

Lots of people have bedrooms on the second floor (or higher) of their home, but going up and down stairs after foot surgery can be difficult and dangerous. If you need to climb stairs to get to your bedroom, consider setting up a bed on a lower level.

A temporary bedroom helps minimize the stairs you need to navigate and makes it easier to get a good night’s rest.

2. Surround yourself with the essentials

Along with your bed, set up an area where you can sit comfortably during the day and keep your foot elevated if needed. Keep all essentials — like your phone, computer, TV, snacks, extra pillows, and medication — nearby so you don’t have to get up often.

3. Plan how you’ll work

These days, workplaces are more flexible than ever, so you may be able to keep working while you’re at home recovering from foot surgery. If you already have a home office, make sure it’s on a lower level and it’s easy to access. If you don’t normally work from home, create a space where you have room to work comfortably. 

If you can’t work from home, make arrangements with your employer. You may not be able to drive for a period of time after foot surgery, so decide if you need to take time off or find someone to drive you to and from work.

4. Clear pathways throughout your home

You should limit your activity level as you recuperate from foot surgery, but you’ll still have to get up from time to time. To reduce your chances of tripping, clear the hallways and pathways you use most often.

Focus on the paths between your temporary bedroom, living room, bathroom, and kitchen. Put away clutter to give you more space to move around, pick up cords, and consider removing rugs to make the floor smoother. 

5. Stock up on simple meals

Make sure you have enough groceries in your house before your foot surgery. You may not feel like standing for long periods to cook, but eating nutritious food is important while you recover. Consider prepping and freezing meal portions ahead of time or purchase premade, microwavable meals.

6. Get your mobility aids in advance

You probably won’t be able to bear weight on your foot right after surgery. Mobility aids, like crutches, a cane or walker, or a knee scooter, can help you get around the house while you heal. 

Talk to Dr. Rosenblum about which mobility aids might be most helpful for you. Get them before surgery and test them out so you know they fit your body properly and help you get around more easily.

Along with mobility aids, think about where you might need to sit and rest during your day and have a footstool nearby. Putting a shower stool in your bathroom can make showering easier and safer when you can’t stand comfortably on both feet.

7. Ask family or friends for help

Recovering from foot surgery takes time, and you don’t have to do it alone. Ask family members or friends to help out, whether it’s preparing meals, driving you somewhere, caring for your pets, or tackling other chores. If no one is available, consider looking into short-term in-home caregiving.

There’s a lot to consider when you’re preparing for foot surgery, but Dr. Rosenblum and our team are here to help. Learn what to expect with a personalized consultation at Foot and Ankle Care of Passaic. Call us at 973-218-5720 or book online now.

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